Tag Archive for linux

2012: The Year Of The Linux Game

Tux the Penguin: Linux MascotThere are a lot of claims that a certain year is the year of something. The year of the PS3, the year of the mobile, etc. Many people make these claims long before anything truly remarkable happens and pretty much all of them fail to live up to their expectations. So rather than look forward and make predictions about whether a certain year will be the year of the Linux game, I am rather going to look back at the last few months and proclaim that 2012 is the Year of the Linux Game.

It seriously took a long time and a lot of trouble to get to this point. Game developers have dismissed Linux as a viable platform and have ignored the pleas of gamers for Linux support. For many years, Linux gamers have resorted to rolling their own solutions for gaining Linux compatibility in the form of emulators and compatibility wrappers. Some companies have sprung up in the past in the hopes of expanding the availability of Linux games, but have failed due to poorly thought out business strategies. So what makes 2012 so different from all the previous years?

The first step in making this year the year of the Linux game was the introduction of the Humble Indie Bundle. Originally the brainchild of Lugaru developer Wolfire Games, it made it a requirement for inclusion in the bundle to have native Linux support. This bundle has gone through five primary incarnations and numerous brand specific bundles. All of them included Linux support for the games. As a response for this inclusion, Linux gamers have paid on average far more than Windows and Mac gamers and have made up anywhere between 15 and 25% of all payments to the bundle.

Humble Indie Bundle #1 Stats

The final sales stats for the original Humble Indie Bundle.

The next major shift towards developer support for Linux gaming was Kickstarter. While Kickstarter was a lot slower on the draw for its influence on Linux gaming, it has really shown its power to shift trends in that direction. Recent high profile games such as the Double Fine Adventure, Wasteland 2 and Shadowrun Returns have revitalized the desire to not just  add Linux support as a reward for exceeding funding goals but also as a primary selling point for funding. The number of game projects on Kickstarter supporting Linux has done nothing but grow. A recent Ubuntu Forums post highlights dozens of game projects that support Linux.

Because of these successful Kickstarter campaigns promising Linux support, we have also seen a major shift in middleware providers as well. With the success of the Wasteland 2 project, Unity3d will be adding support for exporting games to Linux with version 4. This was something that developers have been requesting for several years. It is now happening because of this shift in the market. Another high profile Kickstarter game, Double Fine Adventure, has also resulted in the addition of Linux support for the growing 2D engine, Moai.

Finally, we have also seen the largest digital distribution service for games making the shift toward supporting Linux. Yes, I am talking about Steam. Valve had recently released a Mac client for the Steam platform and with it came many rumors that Linux support was in the pipeline. Earlier this year, Valve finally came clean with the news that, yes, a Linux version of not just Steam but also its Source Engine was coming. The largest digital distribution platform in gaming history is making its way to the smallest PC market. If that is not validation of Linux as a viable platform for gaming, I don’t know what else could convince you.

So with all these events in the last few months, I am confident to say that, yes, 2012 is The Year of the Linux Game.

Linux+Eclipse+AXDT+Flixel

Flixel Flash Engine

This past week, I came across the Flixel engine for Flash game development. I have been looking for something to kelp me speed up development on our game and this looked to be the most promising of the engines I had found.

However, according to the download page, they did not have a IDE based solution to getting Flixel to work in my set up of Ubuntu Linux, Eclipse Helios and AXDT. So I decided to take a stab at getting it up and running myself.

The solution turned out to be easier than I thought it would be, but I need to start from the beginning.

First I am running Ubuntu 11.04 64bit. This version of Linux only has Eclipse 3.5 Galileo in its repositories. So I had to download 3.6 myself. Now when you download Eclipse 3.6, (as of this article, Eclipse is on 3.7. I have not tested this with 3.7 so take caution if you go that route. 3.6 should still be available.) make sure you do not get the Classic version because it doesn’t have the Eclipse Marketplace. Without that, you can’t get AXDT.

Once you download and install Eclipse, follow the installation instructions on the AXDT website to install it. Very simple.

You can actually start programming flash games now. However, we aren’t done yet. Read more

Indie Developer’s Response to the PCGA (Updated)

Matt Ployhar, President of the PCGA

Recently, the PC Gaming Alliance’s (PCGA) new president, Matt Ployhar, held an interview with Gamasutra. While over all the interview was pretty good, it was riddled with fluff and non answers. Granted, Gamasutra interviewer, Kris Graft, didn’t ask some of the tough questions I would have asked, he did ask some that I felt deserved more concrete answers.

So in response, I would like to run down the full list of questions and his answers and respond accordingly.

Can you start with a little bit of your background? Where does your interest in PC gaming come from?

Matt Ployhar: So I’m currently at Intel, and have been for almost three years. I’m kind of a hybrid strategic graphics planner, if you will. One of the main reasons I came over was to kind of get exposure to hardware, and at that point in time we were actually working on the Larabee project.

I just felt like I’m much more aligned with Windows gaming than I am console gaming, at any level. And the Windows guys for years were trying to get me to move over into the DirectX group. So then I moved over, out of Microsoft Games, to get into Windows Div/DX. And then halfway through the [Microsoft Game Studios] re-org, I went on to my last Microsoft stint, which was a couple years on the Windows 7 planning team.

So far so good. Someone who is aware of PC gaming both from the hardware and software side of things. So what will this background provide as incite in the area? Read more

Flash, A Gateway to Cross Platform Development

After careful consideration of a number of options for cross platform game development, We at Divine Knight Gaming have decided to go with Flash. I mentioned this in my last article about game development for Linux, but I didn’t really delve much further into it.

So here I will be explaining exactly what went into this decision.

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Why Do We Hate the Penguin?

After my review of game development on the PC, I came to realize that there is very little if any support for Linux as a viable platform from the creators of game engines for the PC. Even those that advertise that they are cross platform engines only go so far as to be cross platform for Windows and Mac.

As a gamer that has decided to use Linux as my primary OS for me and my family, I find this disheartening.

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